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Tyler Mangum

SENIOR USER RESEARCHER | sPORT SCIENTIST | eNDURANCE cOACH

 
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Tyler is an active Senior User Researcher, Sport Scientist and Endurance Coach up in the Greater Seattle, Washington area. 

Throughout his education, Tyler has focused on a variety of research areas and methodologies, beginning in clinical research, then ultimately transitioned in to market and user experience research as well.  

Currently during the day, Tyler currently works as a Senior User Researcher for Expedia Group, where his areas of research cover Travelocity, Orbitz, Cheaptickets, e-bookers and Wotif.

Occasionally at night, Tyler works as a sport science consultant for the Seattle Seahawks, where he aims to visualize player health status with quantifiable reports.

Additionally, Tyler works as an endurance coach for runners, cyclists and triathletes, where he uses his sports science background to create customized training plans.  

 

7 helpful tips to get your UX research career started.

Interested in UX, but don't know where to start? This blog outlines some helpful tips for those who may be students, interns or others who are just looking to make a career switch.

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What interviewing at the tech giants is really like 

(TO BE PUBLISHED SOON)

Ever wonder what the interview process is like at Microsoft, Facebook, Amazon, Google or Expedia? For better or worse, I've been through them, and the process is grueling. This blog details some of the common questions, and themes across the tech companies. 

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Should I buy an altitude tent to help me train? Hint: no.

What's the science behind altitude tents? Are they right for you? I aim to simplify the science behind "living high and training low," as well as altitude tents in an effort for athletes to get a competitive edge in endurance training. 

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I know my VO2 Max... now what?

(to be published soon)

So your VO2 Max is 54.3 ml/kg/min, and your lactate threshold is 218 Watts on the bike... so what does that mean? What can you do with that knowledge and adapt it to your training? I aim to answer some of endurance athletes most common questions about their bodies and the way they train.